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of you. and let me read this. the city of mcallister is currently work hard to rebalance our budget after a sudden downturn in our revenue over the past two months. as you know, municipalities are required to maintain a balanced budget. it is a law in oklahoma you have to have a balanced budget. so what has he done? first step, we implemented a hiring freeze. they reassigned workers. refer knew shortfall was stimulussed at $1.2 million so every other expense category including supplies, repatience maintenance, fuel, travel, training consulting services and legal services had their budgets reduced. in other words they responded. none of these cuts are without pain but all will be accomplished while maintaining essential city services. now, for mcallister, a $1.2 million budget cut is a bigger hit than we're talking about with sequestration. and yet if the mayor of a 25,000 population community can make the adjustments to serve his constituency without decreasing services why can't we? and i had a ask unanimous -- and i'd ask unanimous consent to enter this into the record. the presiding of
] welcoming cities how could the fez pants and households turn themselves in to developing the cities. and how to find a wide model. how to find a solutions to -- how could we connect with it actual industries. there is still a long journey to go. the second about consumption. right now it's 35%. which is below the world average of 60%. u.s. consumption rate around 70%. huge gap. if we want to really have consumption contribute more to the growth we need to -- such as disparity and income level, social security system, then we have to lead have different level of reform [inaudible] measure of urbanization and the driving to the consumption. which for the topic two foreign guests. i -- to talk about how to drive internal consumption and robert, contribute on social security in china. during urbanization. how people can turn themselves in to city dwellers can contribute. no listen, please. >> the opportunity to continue to urbanize we believe can have 200 billion people moving in to urban center over the next eight to ten years. that's an enormous opportunity. consumption is low, and particular
leavy in oklahoma city and public service as a u.s. magistrate in the western district of oklahoma. as evidence of his career and distinction, when judge bacharach was chosen to be a magistrate judge from a pool of many well-qualified candidates, the chief judge characterized the decision as an easy one. since that time, his colleagues have characterized his service as remarkable, demonstrating superb judicial temperament and a real asset to the western district family and the legal community. as with any position in the judicial branch that comes with a lifetime appointment, the senate must deliberate carefully, and we did and gave all the thought to this nominee, and as was shown and clearly demonstrated by a unanimous vote of confirmation. you don't see this very often but you saw it with judge bacharach. so i appreciate the opportunity to support him today and to have been able to call and be the first to congratulate him in this new part of his career, which we will be very, very proud and i can assure the chair and all the rest of them that this is a guy that we will always b
place in our country yesterday in the city of new orleans. and i want to, of course, congratulate the senators from baltimore, the baltimore ravens, the senators from maryland, the baltimore ravens, particularly senator mikulski, senator cardin, and governor o'malley, who was there, of course, representing. the senators from san francisco and california, the 49ers, senators feinstein and boxer. speaker pelosi was with us yesterday in new orleans. and thousands of fans from all over the world and, of course, watching on television. and i think -- i wanted to make a note on this floor, not because it was just a sporting event -- although it's one of i think the highest watched super bowls ever in the history of the game, but, mr. president, because of the role that this congress played and the administration in helping this great city and region and state rebound from what was a devastating body blow 7 1/2 years ago when hurricane katrina and then rita hit three weeks later and then the levees broke anin over 52 places, the city wt virtually underwater, at least two-thirds of the ci
of the very practices under shaken by the city units that you once operated. for example, as treasury secretary he would be responsible for coordinating implementation of the so-called looker rules, which is intended to separate proprietary trading from the federally insured financial activities. you stated that you support the rule, and yet you were the chief operating officer for the units engaged in the sort of the activities the rule was meant to prevent. therefore if you were to be confirmed it could lead to an awkward situation in which your role as the chair of the fsoc from tester of the fsoc coming to effectively saying to the financial firms do as i say, not as i did. now these are not trivial matters. indeed, they bear directly on your qualifications to serve as the next treasury secretary. if the committee was given time to examine the record more thoroughly before today's hearing, i'm sure many of the questions that have already been answered. we have to explore some of these matters here today. finally, i just want to mention that when we met the nomination i told you th
it's indiscriminate killing, and in the old days you'd throw a rock over the walls of the city, and you didn't see who you killed. if the prophet muhammad used catapults, that means if he lived today, he would use nuclear weapons. people tend to say, oh, that's just religion, people are rational. which isn't quite true. religious fault lines in the middle east are critical. i think once iran goes nuclear, i think we're going to have a severe shia/sunni fortnight, threatening the sunni dominance in the world -- in the middle east. we will probably see very close to that a pakistani, a nuclear presence, a pakistani-extended deterrence in saudi arabia. the saudis finance the pakistani nuclear program. they have a prior agreement with them that if saudi arabia calls for it, they will provide them with nuclear weapons. i doubt that the pakistanis will just deliver a bomb. they would probably station elements in the region, and this would, is going to raise a question regarding for the first time a pakistani second-strike capability against india which would certainly complicate the
city. [applause] now, as part of a new program we'll also ensure though that students at the high schools in great falls can graduate with a certificates that would make them attractive candidates for this company as well. so not only is that better jobs but it is better education. i pledge also to bring a more effective government to montana and we're look that already as well. tomorrow for the first time ever montana's checkbook will be online. [applause] what we'll have and we'll still be improving it but we'll have a database so that anyone in montana or anybody across the world for that matter, can look how we're spending the taxpayers money. it is the right thing to do and it will lead to a more effective government. while there are many so things that i can accomplish without your active engagement and partnership, there are other areas where we need each other. we need each other if we're going to make progress. crafting a budget is one of those areas. montana is the envy of other states. other unemployment is lower and our economy is sounder. our state budget, unlike almo
advantage of it, without unduly exposing it to our adversaries. let me move on to private city and civil liberties. anytime you're talking about sharing the information, sharing information with respect to cybersecurity, you have to be conscious of privacy and civil liberties and you have to make sure those are protected. that has been a priority of the administration and it continues to be so. so, while there are perhaps fewer concerns in the executive order because the focus is on sharing information outward, we have established a robust, oversight regime and in particular we have highlighted the fips. that is the government speak, right? if i don't insert an acronym every two or three minutes it is just not fun. the fips are the fair information practice principles. these date back to the 1970's when they were developed dealing with health records. essentially it is what are the principles you need to use in considering privacy with respect to information? so we think it's important we establish these as a one of the principles that we're going to follow with respect to sharing inform
, a city budget, a state budget that didn't account for the interest you have to pay every year? how ridiculous is that? that's the kind of phony, gimmicky accounting that makes -- puts this country on a path to financial crisis. that's what he said, but even then by that definition, it was not true, and this would not be true, and it's false. well, well, phony accounting procedures, these budget manipulations and gimmicks like this primary balance idea is the way politicians have maneuvered us into a situation that our path is so dangerous. the american people are not happy about it. they should not be happy. there is no reason we have placed this country at such risk because of debt and spending, no reason that we should do that. they sent us here to this congress for a lot of reasons, but the primary reason really is to probably manage their money, manage their program. and so, madam president, i see my colleague from vermont and i think we may get there a different way, but i think we may share some of the same views about this nomination, and i respect his independence and gumpt
give them those tools under this tax -- child tax credit legislation. sanctuary cities reform would prohibit appropriated funds from being used in contravention of the illegal immigration reform and immigrant responsibility act of 1986. and i'm joined by senators grassley and senator fischer in that legislation. too many jurisdictions in the united states are self-proclaimed sanctuary cities, and by doing that they are in contravention of federal immigration law when they say they will not cooperate in the enforcement of that law in any way. that's unacceptable and those cities should not get appropriated funds. everify, i mentioned, is an initiative and legislation by senator grassley. i'm proud to join him as a coauthor. i'm an original cosponsor of that bill. it would take the present everify system and make it mandatory and expand it so that is our work force system of enforcement. everify works. the problem is, it's a pilot. it's not mandatory and it's not broad enough, and we need to broaden and make mandatory that workable everify system. the voter integrity protection act. i
seattle, washington, where he served as a prosecutor for the city of seattle at one point in his career. your turn to talk with representative smith, thank you for holding, you are on the air. >> caller: thank you. i called in because i have heard both sides in these humongous tax cuts that we are giving to places like bank of america and i have listened to c-span for the last 20 years. here's what i have gathered. you have already taken 2% of my money, but you have not taken anything where you are putting the money in. take some money from them. bank of america didn't pay anything. $1.9 billion of our money, you can go out there, i urge you know what is going to happen. i'm going to have to pay this back again, you are not going to fix anything. that is not in regard to republicans or democrats. stop selling out america, please. >> i think you make a good point. revenue has to be part of this equation, certainly corporate tax is a part of the problem. it's interesting that there are a lot of corporations that are complaining about the fact that we have the second highest corporate tax
morgan city and from tibideaux. they said why are you here? i said the same reason you are. louisiana workers go everywhere. we're proud to do it, but we would be glad to be close to home, canada and mexico. our refineries which for the first time in our nation's history -- not in history, but for the first time in many years, our manufacturing base is expanding. and finally, i would just say in this colloquy, ask the senator from north dakota, did -- has he had a conversation happen with the oil minister from canada -- i think it's minister olivier, has he talked with him at all recently? because i did have a conversation with him yesterday and i wanted to maybe share that with the senator from north dakota. mr. hoeven: i recently visited with the after, gary dewar, please go ahead and relate your conversation. ms. landrieu: i wanted to say i had a very good conversation with the canadian minister of natural resources. we had a long conversation, ten or 15 minutes and explained the importance of this development for canada. he also said to me what i just shared with you all, that he
city you would like more people to be registered to vote but yet they are not and that is a choice people make just like citizenship, correct? >> that is correct. >> thank you. i yield back the remainder of my time. >> the gentleman from north carolina is recognized for five minutes. >> i need recognize your resistance to finding a middle ground short of full citizenship, but i ask you if you were an illegal immigrant and the united states was in the business of enforcing our immigration law and your choice was convicted criminal or almost citizen, you would choose almost citizen, wouldn't you? >> as i said before, do i believe that something is better than the zero? sure. i don't believe it is sufficient, but i don't believe that that addresses the entirety of the problem here. redirecting your attention back to mr. forbes question, which you thought was hypothetical and that if you were given the opportunity to write the law and ensure that it passed and we found ourselves ten years later with a large population of illegal immigrants in the country, would you enforce law or come
our people and i hope that it will be a great boost to the great city of lester. >> thank you, mr. speaker. this week announced the work of the services is moving to newcastle, is the latest in a long series of similar announcements affecting the valley, including the closure of our office by the previous government. will the prime minister looked to bring extra work to the office in stock and moving another public sector agency to the east valley? >> i will look very carefully of what my honorable friend says but what i would say is of course we want to make sure that public sector jobs are fairly distributed around the country but we have to be frank, the real need for our economy is a rebalancing with growth and the private sector to make up for the fact that public sector jobs have declined. it should be looked over the last two and half years the million extra private sector jobs has more than offset the decline in private sector, -- in public sector unemployment and that's why we concede unemployment falling around the country. >> the prime minister may not be aware of the o
pieces and multiple rocket launchers that can destroy the city of seoul and a matter of minutes or a few hours if the north koreans unleashed this weaponry. and they have this kind of deterrence to threaten us and they have had it for a long period of time and we are very cognizant about this. another related issue is once north korea malanounts nuclear warheads on its missiles how will that affect the retaliation policy established by the united states and south korea in 2010 following the shelling of the yongbyon island in november of 2010? policy that in a future south korea would have the right to retaliate militarily if north korea committed future provocations and the u.s. was warned? that kind of retaliation? what is going to happen to the u.s. and the are ok attitude toward the retaliation policy once north korea has nuclear warheads on its missiles and can threaten to rain and nuclear missiles down on south korea if south korea does retaliate? how are we going to react to this kind of scenario, which i think we will face once north korea has warheads on those n o nodong missile
. if somebody applied in the, to the mexico city u.s. embassy in january of 2007, and someone else crossed the border and is here in january of 2008, we all agree that the person who waited in line in 2007 should be able to get that green card before the person in 2008. we have to figure out how to do that so it's not an interminalably long period of time, that people are old or dead before they become. at the same time we have to make sure that this principle is kept because that helps us pass a bill. one other point i would make. we made two exceptions to that. dick durbin worked very hard on the dream act. we all agreed that should get special priority. >> young people born here as children? >> yeah. second we'll need something special for agriculture because it is a different situation. virtually whether you're in new york dairy country or arizona ranching country you can't get americans to do this kind of work. >> we're about to get the hook. my penultimate question, senator mccain, have you talked to speaker boehner about this? >> no but i did hear this statement a couple days ago wh
threat towards seoul, north korean, artillery pieces and rocket launchers that can destroy the city of seoul in a matter of minutes or a few hours, if the north koreans unleash this weaponry. and they have this kind of deterrence. to threaten us and they have had it for a long period of time and we are very, very cognizant about this. another related issue in this connection though is that once north korea mounts nuclear warheads on its missiles, how is, how is that going to affect the retaliation policy? that was established between the united states and south korea in 2010, following the shelling of the young pong island in november of 2010. policy that in the future south korea would have the right to retaliate militarily, if north korea committed future provocations and the u.s. would support that kind of retaliation. what is going to happen to the u.s. and the rok attitude towards the retaliation policy once north korea has nuclear war ahead on its missiles and can threaten to rain nuclear missiles down on south korea, if south korea does retaliate? how are we going to react to
and cities and i don't recall wisconsin but i know that for single women it is anywhere from 19,000 to 29,000 that is minimal, rent, heat, all those things that are absolutely necessary. so everyone says we work with a lot of organizations and we would say well we need one on one especially for, like the latino groups and we need one on one for every one really that's what everyone wants and you know that from your research as well. i think what is important is the senior centers and places where people can actually come for help have a great project on libraries and there are not that many of them i think there are 25 that they've found it. i've been to a number of them during programs with them. they are incredible so there are ways we can do this but there is no coordination reach nationally except for these little programs that the national council on aging does a great initiative as well. so why don't know what will happen after the sequestration. .. >> that is an issue that i wonder about. not only do people change jobs, the company is exist for sometimes shorter times and what is t
york city, and is a trained internist and outlook health specialists. and then paul tang, who is board certified practicing internist and vice president and chief innovation and technology officer at palo alto medical foundation in california. he also served during my tenure and since then at the office of national coordinate as a member and now as vice chair of the federal health information technology policy council, or committee, which was established by the congress to advise the office of national corner on health information technology policy. and the third member of our panel, hot summer underground, is christine bechtel, who is the vice president of the national partnership for women and families, where she is responsible for strategic direction and oversight of the organization's multifaceted work. she's also a member of the federal health i.t. policy committee and does high noon work on the role of consumers with respect to health technology and technology generally. so i think the way we're going to proceed, we are one short, we are going to proceed by, i'm closing some ques
. cities are some of the rules we are refining us to come through this first year. a more than happy to talk about ways we are approaching the work in each case because they think that will bring it to life. but since many fewer practitioners, i thought some of these points might fit with some of your own findings. i would just say to you, people already asked me if i'm having fun. first off, it's an unbelievable privilege and it's starting to be fine. sir thank you very much. i'm looking forward to the conversation. >> thank you very much, ambassador and assistant secretary. avalon ask if you're having fun, but i did want to start with a general question. in selecting these four cases are your focusing 80% of your energy, is this a science or an art that you're trying to cultivate? is a systemic approach are trying to develop or are you seeing what you can have a tailoring individual each case? >> it's both. as the result of a process with people at the white house company assistant secretaries secretary for regional bureaus, making sure there is an ambassador who needs help and so,
% of the global population migrates to cities by 2050. further away from the food, where the food is grown, requiring new ways to prevent waste, and enhanced nutrition. here's another illustration, one should stick out all the statistics that are thrown at you so far. in fact, if there's one thing that i hope you will remember from my remarks this morning, it would be this. i still, it's just breathtaking just to say this. a full 30-50% of the food produced in the world rots forgoes unbeaten. -- or goes unbeaten. that to me is one of the most amazing statistics i will ever articulate. up to half of our total global output. except while waste might be the problem here in the developed world, the problem and the developing countries be getting the goods to market, as we all know. roughly 85% of the food produced never crosses international borders. and given the unequal distribution of people in arable land i just mentioned, that is a major obstacle today of feeding the world. so when it comes down to is that we need to produce more, higher quality, more nutritious food, and we need to becom
this and not cut that? that? recently the president had a series of press conferences. he embarked on a 100-city tour to warn americans of the sequester. he showed up at norfolk news -- or newport news, rather, in virginia. almost exactly one year after three of my colleagues were down there, senator graham, senator ayotte and senator mccain, saying in a year there is going to be a big problem. a year later the president shows up and says this is going to be a big problem. you know, the president proposed the sequester in 2011. he insisted that it become law. he even threatened to veto a bill. he said, i'll veto any bill to replace the sequester, late last year. and suddenly now he's changed his mind and all of these terrible things going to happen, and it's unavoidable. it's only unavoidable if we refuse to cut things that can be couple of the federal government has grown 19% in its spending in the last four years. the sequester would cut 2.4% or 2.5%. anybody in america whose budget has grown 19% in the last two years can go back now to where they were the last four years, rather, can go back
york, i'm troubled about the emerging threats as new york city is a top tear row target. we have two missions for wmd under the national guard, cutting those programs, obviously, puts us at grave risk. we have a lot of national guard contingencies and operations throughout the state which is essential for recovery efforts. we saw what an amazing job they did in hurricane sandy so i'm very concerned that with these cuts, we expose ourselves to vulnerabilities. cyber threats is the greatest threat. we do a lot of work for them in the labs, and i'm worried about our training. obviously, it's one of the premier trading operations we have for the army, and we have to keep the resources available. i'd like you to briefly talk about if you can quantify, how are the risks now elevated because of the cuts? >> well, senator, i'll answer briefly and see if one of the chiefs, in terms of their service,ment to respond. you asked the right question. how is risk elevated? so what we provide a deterrent against enemies and assurance of the allies, and then where we can't do as much deterrence or ass
city managers and mayors. and, you know what else? these folks don't speak with an "r" or a "d" beside their name, but, rather, an "a" for american. and their message is very loud, clear, and unmistakable. e.p.a. is overreaching, overbearing, and overstepping boundaries that have long existed. and the question is alway requee same -- they ask, senator, what can you do? what can do you to change how they act? nebraskans frustration is driven by both what e.p.a. is trying to do -- meaning the content of the rules and standards -- as well as how the agency is making its decisions. so today, madam president, i will be introducing several proposals to address these two areas. my first proposal addresses how e.p.a. conducts business, by increasing transparency in policy decisions. i'm introducing a bill that brings agency guidance documents under the coverage of the congressional review act. as currently written, the c.r.a. covers only substantial agency rules. meanwhile, e.p.a. has made use of what they call "guidance documents" to simply circumvent the accountability that comes with the ru
. there is a tensor at the history of this country for the number one effort in the city of washington was to give us the strongest military that any country has nbo to defend against all contingencies. we don't have that anymore. if we go to sequestration is worse. you're from alabama comes locally harder because the number of shops per capita in the defense industry is greater than any other 50 states. >> host: jack next to bobby shaw. hi, jack. >> caller: i have just a quick comment on a previous caller and then a question for senator. a caller called just recently in this segment, saying that mayo clinic didn't take medicare patients. that is incorrect for sure. now senator, you criticized iran for criticizing israel. i ever going criticize israel. i don't much like the state of israel and its not because israel is a nation composed of jewish persons. it's because israel acts unfortunately much like not the state. they have good settlement in occupied territory, which is absolutely against international law and is acknowledged as such by some of the leaders of israel. we have also bombed guys i r
increase in spending. and it's happening every day in cities and counties and states throughout america. they're dealing with far worse reductions than that. and there was no tax increase agreed to at all. not one penny of tax increases. and those reductions in spending are in law. they're in the new baseline that we're now operating on. and to give back that spending without finding reductions in spending elsewhere would be to increase spending above that agreed to in the budget control act. and that is what the democratic outline that we've seen would do. it increases spending. it increases taxes and say don't worry about the increased spending. we've taken care of it. we've raised taxes. so that's the deal. so they raise taxes to pay for the increase. that is in clear violation of the terms of the agreement and the moral agreement we had with the american people. it's in violation of what was told to the american people a little over 18 months ago. and to that extent it's not acceptable. i urge my colleagues not to proceed with this approach. let's find ways to spread out so that mor
, and by his quiet city leadership of the church in uncertain times. people of all nations have been blessed by the sacrifice to sow the seeds of hope, justice and compassion throughout the world in the name of our lord and savior. again, that from house speaker john boehner. in about an hour we will be taking live to an alliance for health reform briefing on medicare policy and the future of the program for an overview looking at how medicare respond to the beneficiaries are, and what changes could occur once the health colossal implemented in 2014. we will have that live at 12:15 eastern on c-span2. the senate begins its work today at 2 p.m. eastern. they will continue work on the violence against women act which could reauthorize the bill for five years. last week senators agreed to consider six amendments to the bill and they will begin voting on those amendments today at 5:30 p.m. eastern. live coverage right here on c-span2. up next, a look at reconstruction in afghanistan. from this morning's "washington journal." >> host: on monday in a last hour of "washington journal" we take a loo
, we are doing at least once a month in major cities and also in some secondary markets like, you know, ann arbor or austin or places where there's a lot of people who are interested in the type of journalism that we do. whether or not the experiencial products will be enough is an open question, but it's certainly part of a trend where from an editorial perspective the journalists are not just researching and writing, they're researching, writing, promoting, engaging in dialogue and then also being important participants in events and interacting with their readers. i think other brands in our field, um, have moved on to, to cafÉs, to retail, i mean, particularly monocl. i think upwards of 20% of their revenue comes from their retail, their stores which they have a dozen, couple dozen of across the world. and there's, you know, still other ideas. i think that, i think that from my perspective, the era of when there were sizable profits in this industry is over. i think it was a pretty fast one in the second part of the 20th century. and we're now having to adapt to a different kind o
can change that cities good ideas can be heard? >> congressman, it comes down to at the ministry of and congressional demand that the mission itself would be effectively carried out. then there has to be a focus and oversight the best way to do that and whether the department of homeland security is implementing it so the extent that if they go back to the suspects in the defense committee the question is are there better ideas that can infect the incorporated command can refine the methodology to do that other than the general contractor type of approach? as we know, the typical approach of the government particularly the dhs is too high year a big player and the innovative small business people that you're talking about simply become players as subcontractors to read the question is can we find a way to make sure that we are fully engaged in the most innovative small business people as they come up with new and innovative ideas and that is an administrative approach within the congress can rightly demand. >> we now recognize you for a question. >> spending tax dollars wisely li
not have massive artillery zeroed in on some nearby friendly city. we need to take that into account. on the other hand, i totally agree with you that iranians have a long tradition and a great interest, and they want to be a power in the region. and one of the questions we have to resolve, while we can't dictate it, is what our role in the region will be in the future, what their role, what our arab friends' role will be and where it will go. and the best of all possible worlds, this is walking hand in hand into the sunset at the end of a hollywood movie. that's pretty far down the road. the second question is that while it would be nice to say there is going to be a line in our discussions with iran if they ever get engaged, if we get into any kind of gear between the regional developments and the iranian bilateral issue, number one nuclear but perhaps others, i think it's going to be hard to do that if the iranians themselves think there is traction to be gained. >> right. >> in dealing with the process. and so one of our problems is not being able to expand the nuclear question s
nuclear bomb or weapon could be smuggled into new york or any city and detonated and go off. so i'll tell you, in some ways that's a good analogy but very often nowadays as soon as people start to talk about nukes as an analogy to cyber, i think they probably don't know what you're talking about because as someone who probably came up with a cold war way of thinking and it's an analogy that if it is almost always false. this is another example of why it's false. loose noose is an easy problem compared to constrain the flow of destructive malware from black market. why? personal loose noose produced almost entirely to every that i know by nationstates. second of all, they give off a signature, right? there's radiation ways you can attract them and it's a physical thing like don't do the obvious but it's something you can track. those are not all the same situation when you come to distrust of malware, which can be produced by an individual which doesn't exist as a physical thing, and passes over borders in a way that is nearly if not completely impossible to track. okay, so i think that i
's from huffington post. to bonnie, let's go to our republican line next, to nicholas in new york city. nicholas, welcome. >> caller: well, it's great to be here, and thank you, and i'll try to make it brief, and let me apologize to the others waiting on line. i just, very quickly, you know, i came here as a child in 1966, and they moved us up to the bronx. we came here through red cross auspices. and, you know, my dad and mom worked two and three jobs, eventually they bought real estate because they saved their money. we were subsistence farmers back home -- >> host: nicholas, where -- where was back home? you said you came here in '66. where was back home? >> caller: montenegro today on border of albanian on the coast of adriatic sea. we were albanian catholics. in fact, we were a minority amongst other minorities, but we were the minority. >> host: back to our question, how do you think these budget cuts will affect you? >> guest: well, i've been watching this thing, and it seems like i've seen this movie before. now, i've worked very hard as my mom and daddied, as my brothers do, a
, so national security issue, so and washington and mexico city the president corporation and building trust, institutional trust mexico understands the views to disagree on something we agree it is such of complicated situation but fighting drugs and trafficking, smugglers, a long way to go but we are much better when fingerpointing would have been with those differences are channels and many times to move on the agenda. but one clarification i am here is a private citizen not public official. when i talk about we it is because it is not we is them. i am hoping you take that into account. what is obvious is the geography with mexico and the destiny of loss. including rocks from columbia, arms not just central america but all over the world salute that is a huge issue. so with needs of social development the flows of people crossing territories as out papers to get to the u.s.. at the same time the source of millions of americans went out of 10 are there and now we received that now is that the core of our own perception of what are mexicans. this graph i did not have time to update bu
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